Archives For space age

into the futuro

December 5, 2014 — 2 Comments

If you can get to London in the next 10 days, you will have the rare chance to visit a restored Futuro House. A prefabricated, spaceship-like structure, the Futuro House was designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen in 1968 as a holiday cabin -

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craig barnes futuro

Built of fiberglass-reinforced polyester plastic, and measuring 26 feet in diameter, the Futuro House sits on a metal stand; it was meant to be easy to build and easy to transport. The idea was to mass produce the structures and sell them around the world, but their design found little favor with the public. Fewer than 100 Futuro Houses were ever built; only about 60 of them exist today, many in disrepair. (For the closest thing to a full list of those that have survived, visit FuturoHouse.net, which has tracked down Futuros in Japan, Russia, Malaysia and Ukraine, among other places.)

Artist Craig Barnes discovered the house above while on vacation in South Africa. He bought it, dismantled it, shipped it to the UK, and spent the past 18 months restoring it to its former glory. At Matt’s Gallery in east London, it is being used as a temporary space for an “intimate and informal series of talks, discussions, lectures, exhibitions, screenings and performances at 4pm every day.”

The floor plan of the original space age round house — the home of George, Jane, Judy, Elroy and Astro Jetson -

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Space age round house in Wilton, Connecticut, designed by architect Richard T. Foster in 1968. “Floating 12 feet off the ground and 72 feet in diameter, the Round House is walled in glass, covered over and under with cedar shingles, and set on a cylindrical base retained by walls of stone.” The house rotates on its base.

A closer look at the house:

If you can stand the cloying mood music, here’s a video tour of the house, showing off its open floor plan, “spacious, spa-like bath,” stainless steel appliances, custom Ash cabinetry, and pristine surroundings.

As of June 2010, the house was on the market for $1.75 million. In 2008, before the market fell, it was selling for $2.3 million.